Air Temperatures The following high temperatures (F) were recorded across the state of Hawaii Saturday…along with the low temperatures Saturday:

89 – 81  Lihue, Kauai
92 – 77  Honolulu, Oahu
92 – 77  Molokai AP
91 – 75  Kahului AP, Maui  
89 – 76  Kona AP, Hawaii
88 – 76  Hilo, Hawaii

Here are the latest 24-hour precipitation totals (inches) for each of the islands Saturday evening:

0.92  Mount Waialeale, Kauai
0.65  Nuuanu Upper, Oahu
0.18  Molokai
0.03  Lanai
0.02  Kahoolawe
2.69  Puu Kukui, Maui
0.74  Waiakea Experimental Stn, Big Island

The following numbers represent the strongest wind gusts (mph) Saturday evening:

24  Port Allen, Kauai
35  Kuaokala, Oahu
29  Molokai
29  Lanai
33 Kahoolawe
33  Kahului AP, Maui
23  South Point, Big Island

Hawaii’s MountainsHere’s a link to the live webcam on the summit of our tallest mountain Mauna Kea (~13,800 feet high) on the Big Island of Hawaii. Here’s the webcam for the ~10,023 feet high Haleakala Crater on Maui. These webcams are available during the daylight hours here in the islands, and at night whenever there’s a big moon shining down. Also, at night you will be able to see the stars, and the sunrise and sunset too…depending upon weather conditions.

 

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The central Pacific remains free of tropical cyclones
(click on the images to enlarge or animate them)

 

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Thunderstorms…in the deeper tropics

 

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Clear to partly cloudy…cloudy areas locally

 

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A few showers locally – Looping image

 

There are no watches, warnings, or advisories at this time

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Hawaii Weather Narrative
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Broad Brush Overview: A ridge of high pressure positioned north of the islands, will maintain moderately strong trade winds. Winds will slow down Sunday and Monday, with another increase in speeds occurring by the middle of the new work week ahead. Increased shower activity and more humid conditions are expected starting late Tuesday through Thursday.

Details: A moderately strong high far northeast of the state, along with an associated ridge, continues to fuel moderate trade winds across the area. High clouds cover skies locally, while low clouds brought in by the trades are located along the windward and mountain sections of the islands. The long lasting high cirrus clouds will finally shift east of us Sunday.

Looking Further Ahead: The trade wind generating high will shift eastward over the next few days, causing the ridge to our north to weaken. As a result, trade winds will decrease through early in the new week ahead. As we push into late Wednesday, another high will build in from the northwest…prompting the trade winds to increase from mid-week into next weekend.

Models show a weak trough will move past the islands around mid-week, likely increasing our incoming moisture. Exactly how much moisture will be available, and how far up the island chain the additional showers will develop…remains uncertain. No strong upper trough is expected though, so perhaps look for the simple solution to be increasing trade showers from Wednesday onward.

Here’s a near real-time Wind Profile of the Pacific Ocean – along with a Closer View of the islands / Here’s the latest Weather Map

Marine Environmental Conditions: A surface high pressure system far northeast of the state will gradually weaken this weekend, which will cause the trade winds to diminish slightly through Tuesday. A new surface high pressure system building far north of the state by the middle of the new week is expected to cause the trade winds to gradually strengthen next Wednesday.

Small south and southwest swells will maintain summertime surf along south facing shores this weekend. A large south-southwest swell arriving Monday, is expected to peak Tuesday, then gradually lower through the rest of next week. Surf heights are expected to reach the High Surf Advisory (HSA) criteria along south facing shores Monday night through Tuesday.

The current west swell produced by tropical cyclones in the Northwest Pacific will continue to slowly decline through Monday. Surf heights produced by this lingering swell will be largest along shorelines with a westerly exposure. A small northwest swell will be possible next Thursday through Friday. Modest surf will persist along east facing shores, then will slowly subside Sunday through early next week…as the trade winds weaken.

 

 

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It’s the weekend!

 


World-wide Tropical Cyclone Activity

 

>>> Here’s the latest Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) Weather Wall Presentation covering the eastern, central, and western Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, and the Arabian Sea, including three tropical disturbances in the eastern Pacific…and one in the western Pacific

>>> Here’s the latest Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) Weather Wall Presentation covering the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico…including a tropical disturbance near Florida


>>> Atlantic Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones 

1.) A small low pressure system, being referred to as Invest 97L, located along the South Carolina coast about midway between Myrtle Beach and Charleston, is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms.

Tropical development of this system is expected to be slow to occur tonight and Sunday due to proximity to land as the disturbance moves northeastward along or near the coast of the Carolinas.

By early Monday, however, the low is expected to move over the warmer Atlantic waters, where some further organization could occur.

The low is forecast to produce heavy rainfall along with a threat of flash flooding in eastern portions of South and North Carolina through Sunday.

* Formation chance through 48 hours…low…20 percent
* Formation chance through 5 days…low…20 percent

Here’s what the computer models are showing

Latest satellite image of the Atlantic

Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

>>> Caribbean Sea: There are no active tropical cyclones

Here’s a satellite image of the Caribbean Sea…and the Gulf of Mexico

>>> Gulf of Mexico: There are no active tropical cyclones

Latest satellite image of the Gulf of Mexico

>>> Eastern Pacific: 

There are no active tropical cyclones

1.) An area of low pressure, being referred to as Invest 95E, located a couple of hundred miles south of the coast of Guatemala, continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms.

NOAA and the National Science Foundation are currently conducting a research mission in this system, and the data from the mission indicate that the circulation remains broad and elongated, and surface pressures are relatively high.

Still, environmental conditions are expected to be conducive for development, and a tropical depression is likely to form early next week while the low moves west-northwestward at about 10 mph parallel to the coast of Mexico.

Regardless of development, moisture associated with the low is forecast to produce heavy rainfall and possible flash flooding across portions of El Salvador, Guatemala, and southeastern Mexico during the next few days.

Here’s what the computer models are showing

* Formation chance through 48 hours…medium…50 percent
* Formation chance through 5 days…high…90 percent


2.) 
A tropical wave is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms, is located about 1300 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. Some slow development of this disturbance is possible during the next couple of days while it moves slowly westward to west-northwestward across the tropical eastern Pacific…at 5-10 mph.

* Formation chance through 48 hours…low…20 percent
* Formation chance through 5 days…low…20 percent

3.) Shower and thunderstorm activity has increased in association with a tropical wave located about 900 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. Some slow development of this system is possible over the next several days while it moves westward to west-northwestward at 5 to 10 mph.

Here’s what the computer models show

* Formation chance through 48 hours…low…10 percent
* Formation chance through 5 days…low…30 percent

Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

>>> Central PacificThere are no active tropical cyclones

Here’s the link to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC)


>>>
Northwest Pacific Ocean: There are no active tropical cyclones

>>> South Pacific Ocean: There are no active tropical cyclones

>>>North and South Indian Oceans / Arabian Sea: There are no active tropical cyclones

 

Interesting: Thousands of Tarantulas Are About to Set Off on Their Annual Migration in Colorado — Southeastern Colorado will soon be experiencing the pitter-patter of little feet, tens of thousands of them, as thousands of male tarantulas begin their annual migration to the prairies to find a mate.

Beginning in late August, Oklahoma brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi, also known as Texas brown tarantulas) will begin their trek through the La Junta, Colorado, area, a journey to undisturbed grasslands that typically lasts through early October, according to a report by The Gazette, a newspaper that serves Colorado Springs.

Female tarantulas hunker down in their prairie burrows for most of their lives, but the males walk for up to 1 mile to find a mate. However, this epic migration will look more like a steady trickle of spiders than a dense carpet of hairy brown bodies, as the tarantulas aren’t social and usually travel alone, Mario Padilla, head entomologist at the Butterfly Pavilion, a nonprofit invertebrate zoo in Westminster, Colorado, told CNN.

Oklahoma brown tarantulas are fuzzy, brownish spiders; females’ bodies measure 3 inches long and weigh about 0.7 ounces, while males are somewhat smaller, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

The spiders produce venom to subdue their prey, though the toxins are not harmful to people. However, tarantulas’ sharp fangs can pierce human skin, and bites can lead to bacterial infection. Tarantulas also defend themselves by brushing off stinging hairs on their abdomen, which can irritate a person’s skin, eyes and respiratory tract, FWS says.

Males typically embark on a female-finding trek when they reach sexual maturity at around 10 years old, CNN reported. And the spiders’ first migration is also their last; while males may remain active through the fall, nearly all of them will be dead by November.

The spiders are most active at dusk in the hour before sunset, and tarantula enthusiasts hoping for a glimpse of the leggy travelers will find plenty of amorous arachnids on Highway 109 on the Comanche National Grassland, according to a recommendation by a La Juntas tourism site.