Air Temperatures The following maximum temperatures (F) were recorded across the state of Hawaii Sunday…along with the minimums Sunday:


79 – 71  Lihue, Kauai
78 – 72  Honolulu, Oahu
83 – 69  Molokai AP
85 - 67   Kahului, Maui
86 - 73  Kona Intl AP, Hawaii
85 – 67  Hilo, Hawaii

Here are the latest 24-hour precipitation totals (inches) for each of the islands, as of Sunday evening:


1.19  Waialae, Kauai
2.52  Waimanalo, Oahu
0.12  Molokai AP, Molokai
0.00  Lanai
0.00  Kahoolawe
0.37  Kepuni, Maui
0.31  Kapapala Ranch, Big Island


The following numbers represent the strongest wind gusts (mph)…as of Sunday evening:


24  Barking Sands, Kauai – NNE
24  Waianae Harbor,
Oahu – NW
10  Molokai – ESE
14  Lanai – SW

13  Kahoolawe – SW
13  Maalaea Bay, Maui – NNE

20  Kohala Ranch, Big Island – NNW


Hawaii’s MountainsHere’s a link to the live web cam on the summit of near 13,800 foot Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. This web cam is available during the daylight hours here in the islands…and when there’s a big moon shining down during the night at times. Plus, during the nights you will be able to see stars, and the sunrise and sunset too… depending upon weather conditions.



Aloha Paragraphs


http://www.weather.unisys.com/satellite/sat_ir_enh_west_loop-12.gif
A low pressure system is moving away towards the
northeast…with its trailing cold front over Oahu


http://www.goes.noaa.gov/GIFS/HAIR.JPG
Frontal cloud band over Oahu and parts of
Maui County


http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/RadarImg/hawaii.gif

Showers are falling over the islands locally…mostly over
Oahu and parts of Maui County


Here’s the looping radar image for the
Hawaiian Islands


High Surf Advisory…surf rising along north and east shores –
starting Monday morning


Small Craft Advisory…rising surf and stronger trade winds over
most coastal and channel waters Monday

 


~~~ Hawaii Weather Narrative
~~~



Winds generally from the southeast, south and southwest
…as a cold front moves through the state from the northwest. Here’s the latest weather map, showing the Hawaiian Islands, and the rest of the North Pacific Ocean, along with a real-time wind profiler of the central Pacific. We find a high pressure system located to the northeast of the state, with an associated ridge of high pressure extending southwest from its center…to near the Big Island. There’s a second large and strong high pressure cell far northwest of the state. As a result of these high pressure features, and a low pressure center located to our north-northeast, with its associated cold front, our winds will come in from the southeast through southwest. Southeasterly winds bring volcanic haze to many parts of the state, as they did today. The trade winds will resume in the wake of the frontal passage into Monday, becoming gusty…lasting through most of the new week.

Showers will be increasing ahead of…and along a cold front today. We’ll turn locally wetter today into Monday, as this front moves across the state. It reached Kauai last night, with clearing skies returning there now. Frontal clouds and showers have shifted over Oahu during the day, and then stall near Maui County later Monday. As the trade winds rebound in the wake of the frontal passage (fropa), the windward sides will see shower activity continuing for several days. The leeward sides in contrast, will turn drier with more favorably inclined weather conditions with time. I’ll be back with more updates on all of the above, I hope you have a great Sunday night wherever you’re spending it! Aloha for now…Glenn.

Friday Evening Film: There are lots of good looking films playing now in the Maui theaters in Kahului. I went with my friend Jeff, and another lady friend of ours Cindy to see one this past Friday. The film was called Ex Machina, starring Alicia Vikander, Domhnall Gleeson, Oscar Issac, Sonoya Mizuno, Claire Selby, and Symara Templeman…among many others. The synopsis: Alex Garland, writer of 28 Days Later and Sunshine, makes his directorial debut with the stylish and cerebral thriller. Caleb Smith (Domhnall Gleeson), a programmer at an internet-search giant, wins a competition to spend a week at the private mountain estate of the company’s brilliant and reclusive CEO, Nathan Bateman (Oscar Isaac). Upon his arrival, Caleb learns that Nathan has chosen him to be the human component in a Turing Test-charging him with evaluating the capabilities, and ultimately the consciousness, of Nathan’s latest experiment in artificial intelligence. That experiment is Ava (Alicia Vikander), a breathtaking A.I. whose emotional intelligence proves more sophisticated–and more deceptive–than the two men could have imagined.

There ended up being four of us seeing this new film, and we all liked it.
Jeff and I gave it an A- grade, while the other two rated it with a B…and B+. This was an edgy film, we could also use the words imaginative, unsettling, and oh so visually stunning. There were convincing moments that had me strongly wondering whether this was a wild daydream, or a clear glimpse into the future. This film portrayed a new kind of intelligence and morality…which used very interesting special effects to develop the story and its characters. This is artificial intelligence at its best, conjuring up thought provoking issues left and right. The film in general was quite slow, although it sped up nicely around the curves so to speak. This was a mind teaser of a film, filled with entertainment galore, ranging between science and philosophy…romance and action in such very cool ways. There was a very interesting hip hop dance scene, which sort of came out of left field, attempting to somehow express the meaning of existence. It was a film that I was very happy to see, and feel comfortable giving it a double thumbs-up to anyone interested in the A.I. experience
. If this write-up has you a little interested…here’s the trailer for you.


World-wide tropical cyclone activity:


>>>
Atlantic Ocean:
The last regularly scheduled Tropical Weather Outlook of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season…has occurred. Routine issuance of the Tropical Weather Outlook will resume on June 1, 2015. During the off-season, Special Tropical Weather Outlooks will be issued as conditions warrant.


Here’s a satellite image of the Atlantic Ocean

>>> Caribbean Sea:
The last regularly scheduled Tropical Weather Outlook of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season…has occurred. Routine issuance of the Tropical Weather Outlook will resume on June 1, 2015. During the off-season, Special Tropical Weather Outlooks will be issued as conditions warrant.


>>> Gulf of Mexico:
The last regularly scheduled Tropical Weather Outlook of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season…has occurred. Routine issuance of the Tropical Weather Outlook will resume on June 1, 2015. During the off-season, Special Tropical Weather Outlooks will be issued as conditions warrant.


Here’s a satellite image of the Caribbean Sea…and the Gulf of Mexico.

>>> Eastern Pacific: The last regularly scheduled Tropical Weather Outlook of the 2014 North Pacific hurricane season…has occurred. Routine issuance of the Tropical Weather Outlook will resume on May 15, 2015. During the off-season, Special Tropical Weather Outlooks will be issued as conditions warrant.


Here’s a wide satellite image that covers the entire area between Mexico, out through the central Pacific…to the International Dateline.


Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)


>>> Central Pacific
: The central north Pacific hurricane season has officially ended. Routine issuance of the tropical weather outlook will resume on June 1, 2015. During the off-season, special tropical weather outlooks will be issued as conditions warrant.


Here’s a link to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC)


>>>
Northwest Pacific Ocean: There are no active tropical cyclones


>>>
South Pacific Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones

>>> North and South Indian Oceans: There are no active tropical cyclones

Here’s a link to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)

 


Interesting:
Putting a value on our Oceans - The ocean’s wealth rivals those of the world’s leading economies, but its resources are rapidly eroding, according to a new World Wildlife Fund (WWF) report. The analysis, Reviving the Ocean Economy: The Case for Action, conservatively estimates the value of key ocean assets to be at least $24 trillion. If compared to the world’s top 10 economies, the ocean would rank as the seventh largest, with an annual value of goods and services of $2.5 trillion.


The report, produced in association with The Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland and The Boston Consulting Group (BCG), combines scientific evidence of environmental degradation with an economic case for urgent conservation action. Using an innovative economic analysis, the ocean’s value is quantified based on assessments of goods and services ranging from fisheries to coastal storm protection, resulting in an overall asset value and an annual dividend output (comparable to a GDP).


“Our oceans are the planet’s natural capital, a ‘factory’ producing an incredible array of goods and services that we all want and need,” said Brad Ack, senior vice president for oceans at WWF. “But every day we are degrading, over-consuming, and polluting this productive asset to a point of ever diminishing returns.”


“Research included in the report shows that at the current rate of ocean warming, coral reefs that provide food, jobs and storm protection to several hundred million people will disappear completely by 2050. More than just warming waters, climate change is inducing increased ocean acidity that if unchecked will take thousands of years for the ocean to repair.


Over-exploitation is another major cause for the ocean’s decline, with 90% of globally-monitored fish stocks either over-exploited or fully exploited. The Pacific bluefin tuna population alone has dropped by 96% from previous levels.


These trends are still reversible however, the report emphasizes. Reviving the Ocean Economy presents an eight-point action plan that could restore ocean resources to their full potential.


Among the most time-critical solutions presented in the report are taking global action on climate change, embedding ocean recovery throughout the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and making good on strong commitments to protect coastal and marine areas.


“The oceans are our global savings account from which we keep making only withdrawals,” said Ack. “To continue this pattern leads to only one place – bankruptcy. It is time for significant reinvestment and protection of this global commons.”