Air Temperatures The following maximum temperatures (F) were recorded across the state of Hawaii Sunday:

82 Lihue, Kauai
88 Honolulu, Oahu
86 Molokai
90 Kahului, Maui
86 Kona, Hawaii
83 Hilo, Hawaii


Air Temperatures ranged between these warmest and coolest spots near sea level – and on the highest mountain tops on Maui and the Big Island…as of 643pm Sunday evening:


Kahului, Maui – 82
Kaneohe, Maui – 75


Haleakala Summit –   52
(near 10,000 feet on Maui)
Mauna Kea Summit – 43 (13,000+ feet on the Big Island)


Hawaii’s MountainsHere’s a link to the live web cam on the summit of near 13,800 foot Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. This web cam is available during the daylight hours here in the islands…and when there’s a big moon shining down during the night at times. Plus, during the nights you will be able to see stars, and the sunrise and sunset too… depending upon weather conditions. Here’s the Haleakala Crater webcam on Maui – if it’s working.

 


Aloha Paragraphs



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Small craft wind advisory…windiest coasts and channels
around the state of Hawaii


Moderately strong trades continuing…stronger at times


Just a few passing showers windward sides





The following numbers represent the most recent top wind gusts (mph), along with directions as of Sunday evening:

25  Port Allen, Kauai – ENE
43  Kahuku Trng, Oahu – ESE
36  Molokai – E
36  Lanai – NE
40  Kahoolawe – ENE
37  Kahului, Maui – NE
35  Upolu airport, Big Island – NE


Here are the latest 24-hour precipitation totals (inches) for each of the islands as of Sunday evening:


2.71  Mount Waialeale, Kauai
2.75  Oahu Forest NWR, Oahu
0.45  Molokai
0.00  Kahoolawe
0.00  Lanai
3.23  Puu Kukui, Maui
2.02  Kawainui Stream, Big Island


We can use the following links to see what’s going on in our area of the north central Pacific Ocean. Here’s the latest NOAA satellite picture – the latest looping satellite image… and finally the latest looping radar image for the Hawaiian Islands.


~~~ Hawaii Weather Narrative ~~~



Moderate to locally strong trade winds…into the new week. Here’s a weather chart showing high pressure systems located to the northwest and northeast of the islands. At the same time, weakening post-tropical depression Henrietta is moving by to the south of the Hawaiian islands. A well established trade wind weather pattern will continue…with no interruptions in the foreseeable future.

Drier weather with fewer clouds into Monday and Tuesday…with another more modest increase in windward showers expected around mid-week. Satellite imagery shows fairly typical low clouds upstream of the islands, which will be carried into the windward sides at times. Here’s the looping radar image, showing just a few light showers falling, mostly over the offshore waters at the time of this writing…with a few over the windward coasts and slopes. Looking ahead, after the possible minor increase in showers during the mid-week time frame, we may see more tropical systems being generated in the eastern Pacific this week. Otherwise, and besides the temporarily stronger winds over the next day or two…fairly typical weather conditions will prevail.


Post-tropical cyclone Henriette will continue to slide by to the southwest of the state of Hawaii. The inclement weather that we saw yesterday, has now moved over the ocean to our west.  Thus far this season, we have continued to dodge bullets so to speak, at least in terms of damaging tropical storm force winds. Granted, we have had lots of summer rainfall, although that was needed, and was much appreciated! TC Flossie brought dynamic thunderstorms, which was exciting…or perhaps a bit intimidating in some areas. TC Gil brought us more rainfall, while current tropical depression Henriette will be too far south to give us any direct impact. The trade winds will surge some today and tomorrow, as a result of this low pressure system migrating by so close, but that won’t be a problem. The central Pacific hurricane season is expected to be less active than normal this year, as most of the action will take place in the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean going forward. Meanwhile, there’s a very dangerous typhoon that’s moving over Luzon Island in the Philippines!


Here’s an IR satellite image of post-tropical cyclone Henriette…with the Big Island to the northeast


My neighbors and I went to see a classical music concert at Seabury Hall in Olinda last evening.
The four performers were from San Francisco, and we enjoyed it very much. These performers were highly accomplished, several of which were Juilliard graduates. Afterwards, we drove down to an Italian restaurant in Makawao, and had a glass of wine together. While we were there, music started playing, so we hit the dance floor. We noticed that a couple of the musicians from the concert were out there dancing around with us! These same neighbors and I went down to our favorite French restaurant here in Kula this morning, where we had coffee and a delicious breakfast sitting outside…enjoying our usual rousing conversation. Then this afternoon, all of my neighbors and I got together for a pasta and salad lunch, which is quite unusual, as many of us do quite a bit of traveling. I’ll be back with your next new weather narrative early Monday morning. I hope you have a great Sunday night wherever you’re spending it! Aloha for now…Glenn.


Friday evening film: There are several decent looking films playing in Kahului now, although I picked one called Red 2. This movie has all kinds of stars, including Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Mary-Louise Parker, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Lee Byung-hun, Anthony Hopkins…among many others. The synopsis: Retired black-ops CIA agent Frank Moses reunites his unlikely team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a missing portable nuclear device. To succeed, they¹ll need to survive an army of relentless assassins, ruthless terrorists and power-crazed government officials, all eager to get their hands on the next-generation weapon. The mission takes Frank and his motley crew to Paris, London and Moscow. Outgunned and out-manned, they have only their cunning wits, their old-school skills, and each other to rely on as they try to save the world‹and stay alive in the process. The critics, and viewers both are giving this film pretty good grades, although not everyone is so impressed. The trailer looks like it will be a typical drama, action and adventure experience. I very much enjoyed this film, despite its corny nature at times, although truth be told…those where entertaining too. The action was near constant during this long 2+ hour film, and I feel confident that if you’re one of those types of people who like this kind of stuff, you will be glad you saw this film! As for a grade, I feel very comfortable giving it a B+ rating – oh alright an A- … what the hell!



World-wide tropical cyclone activity:


Atlantic Ocean: There are no active tropical cyclones


TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS


Caribbean Sea:
There are no active tropical cyclones

TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.


Gulf of Mexico: There are no active tropical cyclones


TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.


Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)


Eastern Pacific:
There are no active tropical cyclones

SATELLITE-DERIVED WIND DATA INDICATE THAT THE AREA OF LOW PRESSURE
LOCATED ABOUT 1100 MILES SOUTHWEST OF THE SOUTHERN TIP OF THE BAJA
CALIFORNIA PENINSULA HAS AN ELONGATED CIRCULATION…AND THE
ASSOCIATED SHOWER AND THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY IS WELL REMOVED FROM
THE SURFACE CENTER. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED TO BE
MARGINALLY CONDUCIVE FOR DEVELOPMENT OVER THE NEXT SEVERAL DAYS
WHILE THE LOW MOVES WESTWARD AT AROUND 15 MPH. THIS SYSTEM HAS A
LOW CHANCE…20 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURSAND A MEDIUM CHANCE…30 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A
TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS.


A TROUGH OF LOW PRESSURE LOCATED ABOUT 1350 MILES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF
THE BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII CONTINUES TO PRODUCE DISORGANIZED SHOWERS
AND THUNDERSTORMS. ANY DEVELOPMENT OF THIS DISTURBANCE IS EXPECTED
TO BE SLOW TO OCCUR AS IT MOVES WESTWARD AT ABOUT 15 MPH OVER THE
NEXT FEW DAYS. THIS SYSTEM HAS A LOW CHANCE…10 PERCENT…OF
BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS…AS WELL AS A
LOW CHANCE…10 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT 5 DAYS.


SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS LOCATED A FEW HUNDRED MILES OFF THE
SOUTHWESTERN COAST OF MEXICO ARE ASSOCIATED WITH A SHARP SURFACE
TROUGH OF LOW PRESSUE. UPPER-LEVEL WINDS DO NOT APPEAR CONDUCIVE
FOR DEVELOPMENT AS THIS DISTURBANCE MOVES WESTWARD AWAY FROM THE
COAST AT ABOUT 10 MPH DURING THE NEXT FEW DAYS. THIS SYSTEM HAS A
LOW CHANCE…10 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS…AND A LOW CHANCE…10 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A
TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS.


Here’s a satellite image showing these three tropical disturbances


Elsewhere, tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 48 hours

Here’s a wide satellite image that covers the entire area between Mexico, out through the central Pacific…to the International Dateline.


Central Pacific Ocean:
Post-tropical cyclone Henriette is now dissipating, here’s the CPHC graphical track map, along with a satellite imagelooping view / Final advisory has been issued.

Here’s a link to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC)…covering our central Pacific.


Western Pacific Ocean:
Typhoon 11W (Utor) remains active, located approximately 115 NM north of Manila, Philippines. Here’s a JTWC graphical track map…along with a NOAA satellite image.


South Pacific Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones

 

North and South Indian Oceans: There are no active tropical cyclones


Here’s a link to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)


Interesting: Perseid meteor shower peaking Sunday and Monday nights.
Dim the lights, grab a blanket and hope for clear skies — an annual magic show, the Perseid meteor shower, can be seen Sunday and Monday nights.


You don’t need tickets to view nature’s free show. And no binoculars are needed, because the flashes may be anywhere in the sky, though they will seem to come from the northeast.


“The crucial issue is that meteors are faint, so you need a location where the sky is dark,” according to Andrew Fraknoi, chairman of the astronomy department at Foothill College in Los Altos Hills. “The darker your site, the more you will see.”


Your best views come after midnight — so it is an event most appreciated by night owls. That’s because the Earth turns after midnight to face the shower, so the meteors come more directly at us. And the crescent moon has set, immersing us in darkness.


At its peak, it is possible to see up to sixty shooting stars per hour. The shower actually started in July and will extend for most of August, but with less drama.


The stars are called the sons of Perseus, because they seem to shoot from that constellation, named after the Greek demigod famed for saving Andromeda from a sea monster. They were first recorded 2,000 years ago.


But they’re not really stars — just meteoric dust, no bigger than the size of a dime. They burn as they careen into the Earth’s atmosphere at 7 to 44 miles per second.


“They are cosmic ‘garbage’ left over from a regularly returning comet, called Swift-Tuttle,” after its discoverers, Fraknoi said. Leftovers from the early days of our solar system, the flashes are the last gasp of cosmic material that formed about 5 billion years ago.


To enjoy the event, get away from city lights and coastal fog. State or city parks or other safe, dark sites are your best bet. Dress warmly for nighttime temperatures.


Once you have settled at your observing spot, lie back so the horizon appears at the edge of your peripheral vision, with the stars and sky filling your field of view. Meteors will grab your attention as they streak by.


Be patient — because they are more subtle than fireworks, it may take up to 15 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark. Several minutes might pass without a single flash.


If it’s cloudy, don’t despair: Another meteor shower, the Leonids, will spark the night sky on Nov. 16.