Air Temperatures The following maximum temperatures (F) were recorded across the state of Hawaii Monday:

87  Lihue, Kauai
87  Honolulu, Oahu
84  Molokai
89  Kahului, Maui
88  Kona, Hawaii
85  Hilo, Hawaii


Air Temperatures ranged between these warmest and coolest spots near sea level – and on the highest mountain tops on Maui and the Big Island…as of 643pm Monday evening:


Port Allen,  Kauai - 84
Hilo, Hawaii – 78


Haleakala Summit –   52
(near 10,000 feet on Maui)
Mauna Kea Summit – 43 (13,000+ feet on the Big Island)


Hawaii’s MountainsHere’s a link to the live web cam on the summit of near 13,800 foot Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. This web cam is available during the daylight hours here in the islands…and when there’s a big moon shining down during the night at times. Plus, during the nights you will be able to see stars, and the sunrise and sunset too… depending upon weather conditions. Here’s the Haleakala Crater webcam on Maui – if it’s working.

 


Aloha Paragraphs



http://lodging4vacations.com/keauhou-kona-condo/1-kona-golf.jpg


Small Craft Wind Advisory…over those windiest coasts and channels
around Maui County and the Big Island


Our local trade winds will remain gusty through Tuesday

Windward showers at times, most generous at night…a
few elsewhere 





The following numbers represent the most recent top wind gusts (mph), along with directions as of Monday evening:

27  Waimea Heights, Kauai – ESE
36  Oahu Forest NWR, Oahu – NNE
29  Molokai – NE
31  Lanai – NE
35  Kahoolawe – NE
33  Kahului, Maui – NE
31  Upolu airport, Big Island – NE


Here are the latest 24-hour precipitation totals (inches) for each of the islands as of Monday evening:


0.26  Mount Waialeale, Kauai
0.09  Manoa Lyon Arboretum, Oahu
0.04  Molokai
0.00  Kahoolawe
0.00  Lanai
0.11  Puu Kukui, Maui
0.20  Kawainui Stream, Big Island


We can use the following links to see what’s going on in our area of the north central Pacific Ocean. Here’s the latest NOAA satellite picture – the latest looping satellite image… and finally the latest looping radar image for the Hawaiian Islands.


~~~ Hawaii Weather Narrative ~~~



The trade winds will remain moderately strong, then weaken during the second half of this work week…rebounding by the weekend. Here’s a weather chart showing two near 1022 millibar high pressure systems located to the north and north-northeast of the islands. The forecast is for active trade winds, lasting through Tuesday. The forecast then calls for our winds easing back around the middle of this week for a few days…recovering by the weekend into next week.

Windward showers, mostly during the night and early mornings…a few leeward at times. Satellite imagery just a few scattered low level clouds out over the ocean. Here’s the looping radar image, showing generally light showers offshore of the islands. As the clouds offshore to our northeast and east arrive at times, we find light shower activity along our windward coasts and slopes. Looking a bit further ahead, as the trade winds ease up during the second half of this week, we should see an increase in afternoon upcountry clouds and showers…above the leeward beaches. As we push into the weekend, we’ll see tropical moisture arriving…increasing showers locally around the islands.


Reflections from Maui:
Here on Maui this evening, skies were clear to partly cloudy…and slightly hazy. The air temperature here in Kula at 5pm was a warm 81.7F degrees, while at the airport in Kahului, at about the same time, it was near 85 degrees…while the Haleakala Crater was 55 degrees. The trade winds remain well established, staying somewhat elevated into Tuesday. The NWS forecast office in Honolulu is continuing the small craft wind advisory active over those windiest parts of Maui County and the Big Island. I expect this advisory to be cancelled by Wednesday, if not sooner, as the trade winds slip down in strength through about Friday. As we get into the weekend, they will strengthen again, with small craft wind advisories likely going back up around Maui County and the Big Island again. It will be interesting to see if the models are correct, in their assumption that tropical moisture will ride up into the state this weekend. I’ll be back early Tuesday morning with your next new weather narrative, I hope you have a great Monday night wherever you’re spending it! Aloha for now…Glenn.


World-wide tropical cyclone activity:


Atlantic Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones

AN ELONGATED AREA OF LOW PRESSURE IS PRODUCING DISORGANIZED SHOWERS
AND THUNDERSTORMS FROM THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN SEA ACROSS THE LESSER
ANTILLES AND INTO THE TROPICAL ATLANTIC. ALTHOUGH UPPER-LEVEL WINDS
ARE CONDUCIVE…THE BROAD NATURE OF THIS DISTURBANCE AND THE
PROXIMITY OF DRY AIR IN THE MIDDLE LEVELS OF THE ATMOSPHERE HAVE
BEEN INHIBITING DEVELOPMENT. CONDITIONS COULD GRADUALLY BECOME
MORE CONDUCIVE FOR DEVELOPMENT WHILE THE SYSTEM MOVES WEST-
NORTHWESTWARD AT AROUND 10 MPH NEAR PUERTO RICO AND HISPANIOLA IN
THE NEXT SEVERAL DAYS. THIS SYSTEM HAS A LOW CHANCE…20
PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48
HOURS
…AND A MEDIUM CHANCE…50 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL
CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS.
REGARDLESS OF TROPICAL CYCLONE
FORMATION…LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL AND GUSTY WINDS ARE EXPECTED TO
AFFECT PORTIONS OF THE LESSER ANTILLES OVER THE NEXT DAY OR TWO.


A TROPICAL WAVE OVER THE YUCATAN PENINSULA IS MOVING WESTWARD AT
ABOUT 10 MPH. THERE IS SOME POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPMENT WHEN THE
WAVE MOVES INTO THE BAY OF CAMPECHE IN A DAY OR SO. THIS SYSTEM
HAS A LOW CHANCE…20 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE
DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS
…AND A MEDIUM CHANCE…30 PERCENT…OF
BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS.


A TROPICAL WAVE WITH AN ASSOCIATED AREA OF LOW PRESSURE IS LOCATED
NEAR THE WEST COAST OF AFRICA…SEVERAL HUNDRED MILES SOUTHEAST OF
THE CAPE VERDE ISLANDS. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED TO
BE MARGINALLY FAVORABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT OVER THE NEXT FEW DAYS
WHILE THE DISTURBANCE MOVES WEST-NORTHWESTWARD TO NORTHWESTWARD AT
10 TO 15 MPH. THIS SYSTEM HAS A LOW CHANCE…10 PERCENT…OF
BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS
…AND A LOW
CHANCE…20 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT 5 DAYS.


Caribbean Sea:
There are no active tropical cyclones


Gulf of Mexico:
There are no active tropical cyclones

Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)


Eastern Pacific:
Post-tropical cyclone 11E (Kiko) is dissipating in the NE Pacific, here’s the NHC graphical track map...along with a NOAA satellite imageFinal Advisory


A LARGE AREA OF DISORGANIZED SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS EXTENDING
FROM THE SOUTHWESTERN COAST OF MEXICO SOUTHWARD FOR SEVERAL HUNDRED
MILES IS ASSOCIATED WITH A TROPICAL WAVE AND A BROAD AREA OF LOW
PRESSURE.  ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED TO BE CONDUCIVE
FOR GRADUAL DEVELOPMENT OF THIS DISTURBANCE WHILE IT MOVES WEST-
NORTHWESTWARD AT ABOUT 10 MPH...AND A TROPICAL DEPRESSION COULD
FORM IN THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS.  THIS SYSTEM HAS A MEDIUM
CHANCE...40 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS...AND A HIGH CHANCE...80 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A
TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS.

 

Here’s a wide satellite image that covers the entire area between Mexico, out through the central Pacific…to the International Dateline.


Central Pacific Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones

 

Here’s a link to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC)


Western Pacific Ocean:
Tropical storm 15W (Toraji) remains active in the northwest Pacific. Here’s the Joint Typhoon Warning Center’s graphical track map…along with a NOAA satellite image.


South Pacific Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones

 

North and South Indian Oceans: There are no active tropical cyclones


Here’s a link to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)


Interesting: Oceanic plume of radioactivity predicted to reach US by 2014 -  A radioactive plume of water in the Pacific Ocean from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant, which was crippled in the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, will likely reach U.S. coastal waters starting in 2014, according to a new study. The long journey of the radioactive particles could help researchers better understand how the ocean’s currents circulate around the world.


Ocean simulations showed that the plume of radioactive cesium-137 released by the Fukushima disaster in 2011 could begin flowing into U.S. coastal waters starting in early 2014 and peak in 2016. Luckily, two ocean currents off the eastern coast of Japan — the Kuroshio Current and the Kuroshio Extension — would have diluted the radioactive material so that its concentration fell well below the World Health Organization’s safety levels within four months of the Fukushima incident. But it could have been a different story if nuclear disaster struck on the other side of Japan.


“The environmental impact could have been worse if the contaminated water would have been released in another oceanic environment in which the circulation was less energetic and turbulent,” said Vincent Rossi, an oceanographer and postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems in Spain.


Fukushima’s radioactive water release has taken its time journeying across the Pacific. By comparison, atmospheric radiation from the Fukushima plant began reaching the U.S. West Coast within just days of the disaster back in 2011.