Air Temperatures The following maximum temperatures (F) were recorded across the state of Hawaii Monday:

85  Lihue, Kauai
88  Honolulu, Oahu
83  Molokai
89  Kahului, Maui
86  Kona, Hawaii
83  Hilo, Hawaii


Air Temperatures ranged between these warmest and coolest spots near sea level – and on the highest mountain tops on Maui and the Big Island…as of 810pm Monday evening:


Kailua Kona – 82
Hana airport, Maui – 75


Haleakala Summit –   52
(near 10,000 feet on Maui)
Mauna Kea Summit – 41 (13,000+ feet on the Big Island)


Hawaii’s MountainsHere’s a link to the live web cam on the summit of near 13,800 foot Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. This web cam is available during the daylight hours here in the islands…and when there’s a big moon shining down during the night at times. Plus, during the nights you will be able to see stars, and the sunrise and sunset too… depending upon weather conditions. Here’s the Haleakala Crater webcam on Maui – if it’s working.

 


Aloha Paragraphs



http://25.media.tumblr.com/20c8eeabadb4ae61e48595031beb187c/tumblr_mm2nlboJpC1rjcvaoo1_1280.jpg


Light to moderately strong trades through mid-week


Windward showers at times locally…some afternoon
upcountry showers here and there too

Nice sunset Tuesday morning

 





The following numbers represent the most recent top wind gusts (mph), along with directions as of Monday evening:

22  Waimea Heights, Kauai – NW
23  Kahuku Trng, Oahu – ESE
20  Molokai – E
16  Lanai – SE
27  Kahoolawe – NE
29  Kahului, Maui – NE
27  Kealakomo, Big Island – ENE


Here are the latest 24-hour precipitation totals (inches) for each of the islands as of Monday evening:


0.66  Mount Waialeale, Kauai
0.16  Oahu Forest NWR, Oahu
0.03  Molokai
0.00  Kahoolawe
0.00  Lanai
0.06  Puu Kukui, Maui
1.00  Honokaa, Big Island


We can use the following links to see what’s going on in our area of the north central Pacific Ocean. Here’s the latest NOAA satellite picture – the latest looping satellite image… and finally the latest looping radar image for the Hawaiian Islands.


~~~ Hawaii Weather Narrative ~~~



The trade winds will continue blowing, although a bit lighter through mid-week…then increasing slowly Thursday onwards. Here’s a weather chart showing two near 1026 millibar high pressure systems located far to the northwest and northeast of the islands. There are also many low pressure systems, and low pressure troughs in the central Pacific now too. Our long lasting trade wind weather pattern will continue through this new week…becoming moderate to locally strong and gusty by the weekend.

Generally favorable weather prevails, with windward showers at times...with a few upcountry afternoon showers too. Satellite imagery shows scattered low cloud patches over the ocean surround the islands, being carried into the windward sides at times. We see one large patch of clouds moving into the Big Island and Maui County, which will bring an increase in showers to the windward sides of those islands tonight. The leeward beaches will be mostly clear to partly cloudy during the mornings…with cloudy areas and localized showers in the upcountry areas during the afternoon hours. At the same time, we can see high level clouds to our west…and just to the southeast of the Big Island. Here’s the looping radar image, showing showers falling over the nearby ocean, and along the windward coasts and slopes in a few places.


Tropical depression 03C is now active in our central Pacific.
There’s still a tropical disturbance in our central Pacific waters as well, which has a low 10% chance of developing into a tropical cyclone over the next couple of days…to the southeast of the Big Island. Here’s a satellite picture, showing this area circled in yellow, along with TD 03C. There’s no danger of any tropical systems having a negative impact on our islands at this time. I’ll be back with your next new weather narrative early Tuesday morning. By the way, Tuesday evening will be the time of our August full moon. I hope you have a great Monday night wherever you’re spending it! Aloha for now…Glenn.



World-wide tropical cyclone activity:


Atlantic Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones


TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS


Caribbean Sea:
There are no active tropical cyclones


TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.


Gulf of Mexico: There are no active tropical cyclones


TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)


Eastern Pacific:
There are no active tropical cyclones

A BROAD AREA OF LOW PRESSURE LOCATED SEVERAL HUNDRED MILES
SOUTH-SOUTHWEST OF MANZANILLO MEXICO CONTINUES TO PRODUCED A
LARGE AREA OF DISORGANIZED SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS. ENVIRONMENTAL
CONDITIONS APPEAR TO BE CONDUCIVE FOR GRADUAL DEVELOPMENT OF THIS
SYSTEM…AND A TROPICAL DEPRESSION COULD FORM DURING THE NEXT
SEVERAL DAYS. THIS SYSTEM HAS A MEDIUM CHANCE…30 PERCENT…OF
BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS
AND A HIGH
CHANCE…80 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT FIVE
DAYS WHILE IT MOVES NORTHWESTWARD AND THEN NORTH-
NORTHWESTWARD.


AN AREA OF DISTURBED WEATHER IS LOCATED ABOUT 900 MILES SOUTHWEST OF
THE SOUTHERN TIP OF THE BAJA CALIFORNIA PENINSULA. DEVELOPMENT…IF
ANY…OF THIS SYSTEM SHOULD BE SLOW TO OCCUR DURING THE NEXT
SEVERAL DAYS. THIS DISTURBANCE HAS A LOW CHANCE…10 PERCENT…OF
BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS…AND A LOW
CHANCE…20 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE
NEXT 5 DAYS
WHILE IT REMAINS NEARLY STATIONARY OR MOVES SLOWLY
NORTHWARD.


Here’s a wide satellite image that covers the entire area between Mexico, out through the central Pacific…to the International Dateline.


Central Pacific Ocean: Tropical depression 03C remains active in the central Pacific. Here’s the CPHC graphical track map…along with a NOAA satellite image


Showers and thunderstorms associated with a disturbance about 700 miles southeast of Hilo Hawaii are showing limited signs of increased organization this evening. Strong upper level winds are expected to prevent significant development within this area through Tuesday, but winds aloft may weaken Wednesday. This system has a low chance, 10 percent, of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.


Here’s a satellite image showing this tropical disturbance…and TD 03C

Here’s a link to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC)…covering our central Pacific.


Western Pacific Ocean:
Tropical storm 12W (Trami) remains active in the western Pacific. Here’s the JTWC graphical track map…along with a NOAA satellite image.


Typhoon Pewa (01C)
remains active in the western Pacific. Here’s the JTWC graphical track map…along with a NOAA satellite image


South Pacific Ocean:
There are no active tropical cyclones

 

North and South Indian Oceans: There are no active tropical cyclones


Here’s a link to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)


Interesting: How much will climate change cost coastal cities? - Global damage from flooding could cost coastal cities as much as US$1 trillion per year — and developing countries will be hardest hit, a study warns.


According to the paper published today in Nature Climate Change, a “risk sensitive planning” strategy is needed to protect coastal cities, which are increasingly at risk because of climate change, subsidence and a growing population.


The researchers looked at the 136 largest coastal cities in the world and found that cities in developing countries are particularly vulnerable to flood losses as they often lack resources for long term planning.


“No city is doomed, but we have to expect huge disasters in the future. And better international coordination to provide support for the affected countries is really important,” says Stephane Hallegatte, senior economist at the Sustainable Development Network of the World Bank and lead author of the study.


“For each city we assessed the total cost of potential damages,” says Hallegatte. “But we also looked at the relative losses, comparing the absolute cost to the city’s gross domestic product, to give an idea of the actual vulnerability of each city.”


Among the top 20 cities with highest relative losses in proportion to their gross domestic product in 2005, only three are located in developed countries. The list is topped by cities such as Guangzhou in China, Guayaquil in Ecuador, Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, Abidjan in the Ivory Coast, Zhanjiang in China and Mumbai in India.